Press-releases, Publications

The law on educational activities

On March 16, 2021, the State Duma in the final third reading approved the amendments to the Federal Law “On Education in the Russian Federation” also referred to as the “Law on Educational Activities” in media.

71% of Russians have not heard anything about this law, 23% have heard something, and 6% are well aware of the adoption of the law.

Did you know that the State Duma passed a law on controlling educational activities?

Readers of telegram channels are the most aware of the adoption of the law: 46% are either well aware of the law or have heard at least something about it. The figure is quite high among those who prefer other new media: 37% of online media readers and 36% of social media readers. Television viewers heard the least about the law – 27%

There is no clear-cut public attitude toward the new law in society. One-third of Russians (36%) believe the law is intended to increase censorship; slightly fewer (30%) believe the law is needed to combat anti-Russian propaganda. 34% of respondents had difficulty answering.

There are still debates in society about this law. Legislators believe that the law is aimed at combating anti-Russian propaganda carried out under the guise of educational activities. Many academic and cultural figures who oppose the law believe it is aimed at increasing censorship and suppressing dissent. What is your own view of this law?

Among those who are well aware of the new law, the majority (65%) believe it is aimed at increasing censorship, and only a quarter (25%) believe it is aimed at combating anti-Russian propaganda. Among those who have heard something about the law, opinions about it were divided almost equally: 42% and 40%, respectively. Among those who have not heard anything about the law, 32% believe that it is intended to suppress dissent, while 27% believe it is aimed at countering anti-Russian propaganda (the remainder found it difficult to answer).

Almost half of young respondents aged 18-24 (45%) believe the law is intended to increase censorship, while 23% believe it is designed to combat propaganda against Russia. Respondents aged 55 and older are more likely to believe that the law is intended to combat anti-Russian propaganda, an opinion held by 36%.

The majority of readers of Telegram channels (64%) believe that the law is aimed at increasing censorship. This view prevails among readers of online media and social networks: 48% and 51%, respectively. Among television viewers and radio listeners, the version that the law is intended to combat anti-Russian propaganda has a relative advantage – 39% and 37%, respectively.

The ANO Levada Center has been included in the registry of non-commercial organizations acting as foreign agents. Read the Director of the Levada Center’s statement of disagreement with this decision here.